Dvorak - Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra Of LondonNew World Symphony #5Dvorak - Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra Of London - New World Symphony #5 - 1956 Westminster Records WL-5370EX Vinyl / EX Cover. Very Good Plus playback and sound with light crackle or background noise throughout. Glossy vinyl with no marks is a visual NM Minus or better - no scratches. Some age discolor...36.00

Dvorak - Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra Of London - New World Symphony #5 - 1956 Westminster Records WL-5370 [Expired]


no longer for sale

EX Vinyl / EX Cover. Very Good Plus playback and sound with light crackle or background noise throughout. Glossy vinyl with no marks is a visual NM Minus or better - no scratches. Some age discolorations on rear cover but has very tight edges, spine and corners and decent brightness. Original clear poly bag inner sleeve. RED Westminster original label version. Good dynamics and a balance sound - vinyl grade lowered due to presence of background noise - still an enjoyable play. ......Dvorak: "New World" Symphony (No. 5 in E minor, Op. 95). Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of London, Artur Rodzinski, conductor. Westminster WL 5370 (or XWN 18295). You can tell something about the vintage of this recording by the numbering of the symphony. This was back in the days when the New World Symphony was known as No. 5." A decade or so later, Dvorak's symphonies were re-numbered in keeping with their actual order of composition, so the E-Minor Symphony became, transitionally, the "No. 5 (No. 9)", and finally, simply No 9. Continuing the trend in nomenclature: what was on this record the Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of London we now know as The London Philharmonic (just as the New York Philharmonic was called the Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of New York prior to Leonard Bernstein.) Artur Rodzinski, aka "Artur Rodzinski," went on to record the entire Dvorak symphonic cycle, with its new numbers and in stereo, for Philips. WL 5370 was recorded in London in 1954. You might well ask if I'm serious about recommending a major symphonic work in early mono. You bet. To be sure, the left/right space isn’t there, but depth is. The natural timbres of the winds and strings, especially in the Largo, are lovely; the weight and power of the ff attacks of the low strings and tympani in the opening Allegro molto just might push your chair back a pace. Rodzinski's inspired performance is just idiosyncratic enough to keep you on your toes. The movements that surround his eloquent reading of the Largo form one of the more vigorous, spirited New Worlds on record. It is as if Rodzinski feels that the elegiac second movement, like the eye of a hurricane, is the heart and soul of the entire work, and that the outer movements serve to protect it with all the spirit and authority they can muster. The WL red label is preferred, but the blue label (XWN-18295) is quite acceptable. Soundbyte Side A & B: http://tinyurl.com/yddurzyp Actual Photos: http://tinyurl.com/ycghnuxt